Video: Art Institutes Change

Harvestworks Digital Media Arts Center presents Art Institutes Change, a short video that shows examples of our programs and services for artists working with new and evolving technologies. Help us get $35,000 for a rebranding effort for non-profit organizations! What do you have to do? Just click on our video to “like” it. Just click, yes, that’s all what it takes. Click here – Please note you have to vote for us on this website, not on the YouTube page:

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Founded as a not-for-profit organization by artists in 1977, Harvestworks has helped two generations of artists create new works using technology. Our mission is to support the creation and presentation of art works achieved through the use of new and evolving technologies.

Now in the early 21st century, our goal is to establish an ongoing network for innovation. We experiment with new models for sustainable artistic practice by pairing artists with industry to work together so that the products of their research can reach the commercial sector where they can be capitalized and impact the individuals and companies who generate the technology industry in New York City.

Harvestworks Digital Media Arts Center presents Art Institutes Change, a short video that shows examples of our programs and services for artists working with new and evolving technologies.

1) The first clip is documentation from an exhibition of two works by cinema software artist Barbara Lattanzi – “Optical De-dramatization Engine (O.D.E.) applied in 40-hour cycles to Thomas Ince’s ‘The Invaders’, 1912″ and “Optical De-dramatization Engine (O.D.E.) applied in 15-hour cycles to Ma-Xu Weibang’s ‘Yeban gesheng’ (Song at Midnight), 1937″. Both works exhibit the artist’s use of software to decompose visual representations originally focused on human drama in order to foreground the simultaneous inhuman expression of light.

2) An excerpt from the Sonifying Wireless Data: Snuff Workshop. “Snuff” is a workshop to create a device that amplifies wireless internet traffic, bluetooth data transfer, mobile phones, microwaves and other devices with electromagnetic activity in the 2.4 GHz range.

3) Rainforest V, An electro-acoustic environment conceived by David Tudor and realized by the group Composers Inside Electronics in the 2011 New York Electronic Art Festival in Fort Jay on Governors Island.

4) Documentation from the performance series called Cage Transmitted: Flanigan/Chavez/MV Carbon, a collaboration with Norte Maar and Experiments in Art and Technology (E.A.T.) to present New York- based sound artists Lesley Flanigan, Maria Chavez and MV Carbon who are each known for the sculptural intricacies of their experiments in electronics with music, noise and improvised sound performances.

5) Angie Eng’s piece Liminal. Liminal is a multimedia performance that continues the tradition of visual music by combining new inventive tools such as the VideoBass, French avant garde experimental cinema tricks and customized music/video software (Max, Jitter, VDMX and Module 8). This collaboration of music and video crosses genres: experimental jazz, neo-abstract expressionism, puppetry and live experimental cinema.

6) Mad Max Noise Vest, created by Jimmy Joe Roche in the 2012 Harvestworks Creative Residency Program. We worked with Jimmy to expand the auditory capacity of the instrument through physical additions such as knobs, buttons and pressure sensitive strips to control audio.

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