[Jan 27] Making Things Feel: Introduction to Arduino + Processing

The physical world is slowly finding itself deeply interwoven with the digital universe. Human-computer interaction design is accelerating, sensors are being placed almost everywhere, and artists are now better able to combine the real world with their digital creations using the Arduino microcontroller and Processing programming language.

Making Things Feel: Introduction to Arduino + Processing

Andrew Sigler
Sun, Jan 27, noon to 6pm
Cost: $125 (student/member), $150 (regular)
Take both classes (Sat/Sun) and receive a $50 discount!

THIS CLASS IS SOLD OUT

Location:

Harvestworks – www.harvestworks.org
596 Broadway, #602 | New York, NY 10012 | Phone: 212-431-1130
Subway: F/M/D/B Broadway/Lafayette, R Prince, 6 Bleeker

arduino2The physical world is slowly finding itself deeply interwoven with the digital universe. Human-computer interaction design is accelerating, sensors are being placed almost everywhere, and artists are now better able to combine the real world with their digital creations using the Arduino microcontroller and Processing programming language.

WHO IS THIS CLASS FOR?

Have you made a Processing sketch that you want to only start when someone sits in a chair? Are you a musician who wants to create your own musical instruments? Or a dancer who wishes to better control your music and visuals while performing? If so, than this class is for you.

Some experience with Processing is recommended, as we will not be covering its basics, but instead using it as a means for controlling and listening to our Arduino.

WHAT IS ARDUINO?

arduino1Arduino is “an open-source electronics prototyping platform based on flexible, easy-to-use hardware and software. It’s intended for artists, designers, hobbyists, and anyone interested in creating interactive objects or environments.” In essence, Arduino is a very small computer that, when used creatively, can expand an artists work to encompass the physical world around it. With this ability to measure and regulate electricity, you can control motors and LEDs, read sensor values, and connect objects to the internet.

WHAT WILL BE COVERED IN CLASS?

This class will be hands on, with the students following along with the instructor. We will start with the basics of electricity, how to light an LED, and create a switch. We will then learn how to program our Arduino to listen to and control electrical currents. This will involve using sensors, like switches, force-sensitive-resistors, and photocells, in addition to controlling output, like lights and motors.

After covering input-output, we will spend the rest of class discussing basic serial communication and how to use Processing to visualize our sensor readings and control those motors and LEDs.

MATERIALS FOR CLASS:

Students will need to bring their own Arduino, sensors, and actuators. A list of materials we will use in class can be purchased at the following link:

https://www.sparkfun.com/wish_lists/53881

 

While we will be covering all the items on this list, students are welcome to opt out of purchasing them all, and can bring in any other materials they wish to work with.

arduino4

BIO

Andy Sigler is a current graduate student at New York University’s Interactive Telecommunications Program (ITP). His previous experience includes teaching and tutoring media production and programming, and currently his interests lie in musical interfaces, networks, and education. His focus at ITP it to study the creative process as it relates to emerging technologies, and how to better broaden the base of creative designers and makers. Through his own work as a new media artists and instructor, he believes the infinite applications for new technologies should not be hidden on top of a mountain of programming and electronics, only accessible to those able to absorb such knowledge. It is this belief that has led him to ITP, and through his own work and studies he hopes to begin broadening the base.

Top article photo: “Cat Car” by Sam Brenner.

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