[July 13] Fragility Performance with the DreamTime Ensemble

Fragility, An Exploration of Polyrhythms will be performed by the DreamTime Ensemble with Claudia Acuña -vocals, Yuka Honda-electronics, Jake Landau-keyboards and guitars, Susie Ibarra-drumset and percussion. A co-presentation with Asia Society.

July 13 – 4 pm: Performance with the DreamTime Ensemble

Free

Nolan Park Building 10a Governors Island

For the July 13th performance DreamTime Ensemble performs a game piece inviting the audience to conduct the ensemble through rhythms and musical motifs in an outdoor setting during the performance.

The DreamTime Ensemble was formed by composer and bandleader Susie Ibarra,   Ibarra released their first album, Perception,  in Dec 2017 which was chosen as a top ten playlist for the NYTimes and featured in WBGO’s Take Five Gives the Drummer Some with featured Drummer-Led records. The album has many influences, including the late, great Brazilian percussionist Naná Vasconcelos, who was actually meant to record for the album. But Ibarra’s strongest desire was to capture the sensory experience, and explore how it could create new or differing perspectives.

Susie Ibarra
  • About Fragility

DreamTime Ensemble performs a new program of work by Ibarra titled Fragility: An Exploration of Polyrhythms commissioned for Asia Society in partnership with Pioneer Works artist residency program.  An immersive performance, Fragility uses polyrhythms as a model for human interdependence.  Ibarra is capturing the concept of fragility through music, exploring the subtle intersections that affect relationships. She conceives the musical structure of Fragility as a ‘game piece’ in which the rules require performers and audience members to take turns conducting and shifting roles.

Drawing on deep knowledge of Asian and jazz percussive traditions, Ibarra and DreamTime Ensemble lead audiences on a journey into a mesmerizing musical environment of multi-layered sonic textures. 

DreamTime Ensemble formed by composer and bandleader Susie Ibarra, features Claudia Acuña -vocals, Jennifer Choi -violin, Yves Dharamraj -cello, Jake Landau -guitar, piano, and keyboards, Yuka Honda -electronics, and herself -drumset,percussion.  Ibarra released their first album, Perception,  in Dec 2017 which was chosen in that months top ten playlist for the NYTimes, premiered at WinterJazzFest NYC 2018, and featured in WBGO’s Take Five Gives the Drummer Some with featured Drummer-Led records.
The album has many influences, including the late, great Brazilian percussionist Naná Vasconcelos, who was meant to record for the album. But Ibarra’s strongest desire was to capture the sensory experience, and explore how it could create new or differing perspectives. 
DreamTime Ensemble also performed a new program of work by Ibarra titled Fragility: An Exploration of Polyrhythms commissioned for Asia Society in partnership with Pioneer Works artist residency program. This piece was the world premiere of Susie Ibarra’s new immersive performance. Using polyrhythms as a model for human interdependence, Ibarra captures the concept of fragility through music, exploring the subtle intersections that affect relationships. Ibarra conceived the music of Fragility as a ‘game piece’ in which the rules require performers to take turns conducting and shifting roles.
Drawing on deep knowledge of Asian and jazz percussive traditions, Ibarra and DreamTime Ensemble led audiences on a journey into a mesmerizing musical environment of multi-layered sonic textures. Dancer Souleymane Badolo interacted with custom-built motion capture technology in which the dancer’s movements trigger recorded sounds to create a live rhythmic composition.  Sound Design was led by Justin Frye with Stage Design and Lighting by Clifton Taylor. Interactive Systems Design was created by Tommy Martinez. The performance of Fragility took place in the Asia Society Museum’s Starr Gallery with musicians at the center, audience surrounding them, and a multi-channel surround sound installation.


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