[Jun 8] Drew Krause: Rings of Eight | Shelley Hirsch: Tohuwabohu

Drew Krause’s “Rings of Eight” is a study in deploying computer-generated sounds through an 8-channel system in various ways. The material was developed using various random, iterative, and deterministic processes in the Supercollider synthesis language. Shelley Hirsch’s “Tohuwabohu” is a “choral” piece originally created as a 5.1 surround sound piece for an installation with Ursula Scherrer called Alga at the Minoritan Church in Krems Austria and then adapted for KunstRadio /Radio ORF in Vienna, now extended to 8 channels for Harvestworks. This event is part of 2013 New York Electronic Art Festival.

[Jun 8] Drew Krause: Rings of Eight | Shelley Hirsch: Tohuwabohu

Works for 8-channel Playback

Drew Krause w/ David Reeder and Daniel Palkowski
Shelley Hirsch
Sat, June 8th, 7pm
Admission: FREE

Location:
Harvestworks – www.harvestworks.org
596 Broadway, #602 | New York, NY 10012 | Phone: 212-431-1130
Subway: F/M/D/B Broadway/Lafayette, R Prince, 6 Bleeker

Drew Krause’s Rings of Eight is a 23-minute composition for 8-channel playback. The piece is a study in deploying computer-generated sounds through an 8-channel system in various ways. The material was developed in Fall-Winter 2012-13 using various random, iterative, and deterministic processess in the Supercollider synthesis language. The piece juxtaposes static, slowly-evolving, and active textures that were constructed using filtered noise, ring modulation, and resonant filters, each subjected to multiple transformations.

new-bioShelley Hirsch’s Tohuwabohu is a “choral” piece originally created as a 5.1 surround sound piece for an installation with Ursula Scherrer called Alga at the Minoritan Church in Krems Austria and then adapted for KunstRadio /Radio Orf in Vienna, now extended to 8 channels for Harvestworks. Tohuwabohu is a Biblical Hebrew phrase found in the Book of Genesis. It is usually translated “waste and void,” “formless and empty,” or some variation of the same. It describes the condition of the earth before God said, “Let there be light”. In German it implies chaos/void, in French.. commotion.

Drew Krause has composed music using computer algorithms for over 15 years. His music is published by Frog Peak and MLKeepe Publications, has been recorded by Innova, Capstone, New Ariel, Frog Peak, Pogus, AUR, and Bonk Records, and has been performed in Paris, Buenos Aires, Dublin, Zurich, and widely throughout the United States. He has received grants from Harvestworks, The MacDowell Colony, The Wurlitzer Foundation, and Meet the Composer, and residencies at Stanford University and Brooklyn College. Author of an extensive Common Lisp library for algorithmic music composition, he is on the faculty of New York University.

LemurBots composer residency project: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZepuEI62TTU
Lecture to LispNYC on Algorithmic Composition (November 2012): http://vimeo.com/54910233
Drew Krause website: http://www.wordecho.org

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