Using Processing To Capture Data

While it can be time consuming to sift through your lines of code in search of a lost semi-colon, Processing offers users the ability to seamlessly integrate with large amounts of data. In today’s day and age data is stored by many companies and businesses and is easily accessible to web users. With this class you’ll learn how to find and prepare that data, get it into Processing, and finally turn it into the pretty project you’ve always dreamed of.

[Oct 8] Using Processing To Capture Data

Liz Taylor
Sun, Oct 8th, 2011, noon to 6pm
Cost: Regular: $125, Members & Students (with ID): $110

Location:
Harvestworks – www.harvestworks.org
596 Broadway, #602 | New York, NY 10012 | Phone: 212-431-1130
Subway: F/M/D/B Broadway/Lafayette, R Prince, 6 Bleeker

While it can be time consuming to sift through your lines of code in search of a lost semi-colon, Processing offers users the ability to seamlessly integrate with large amounts of data. In today’s day and age data is stored by many companies and businesses and is easily accessible to web users. With this class you’ll learn how to find and prepare that data, get it into Processing, and finally turn it into the pretty project you’ve always dreamed of. In addition to using existing data sources, you can use an arduino with processing to create your own.
What we will cover in class:
During the first half of the class we’ll talk about data sources and formats: where to find it and how to get it into a form Processing can work with. Then we’ll talk about different methods of using it within your program to create interesting projects.
During the second half of the class we’ll discuss the Arduino. Processing and Arduino are great sister languages that work together to help you get input from the real world into your program. We’ll start with Arduino basics and then transition into using it within Processing (which gives you a greater variety of visual power). No experience in the Arduino is required, we’ll start with the basics of a bread board and making a light blink and end with an understanding of how to interface your programs with sensors.
In the end, we’ll have a work session where everyone can look for data or work with sensors and practice getting it workable in Processing.

Liz Taylor is a new media artist whose interests lie in the intersection of art, design, and technology. While studying digital media at Florida State University she explored the elements of data portrayal and art installation through an Undergraduate Thesis focused on utilizing Processing. While completing a Masters in Fine Arts in Design and Technology at Parsons School of Design she investigates such topics as memory and personal identity through blending mediums such as illustration, computer programming, paper cut, motion graphics, installation, and soft circuitry techniques.

 

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